Spirit In Action

Change IS coming. WE can make it GOOD.


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Navajos and Appalachians protest Peabody Coal, protesters arrested

“The mine affects lots of ways of life. It’s destroying the places that have names. Everywhere you go here, every place has a name: names I learned from my grandparents, names that have existed for hundreds of years. A lot of those places and knowledge of those places and cultural values are being destroyed by the mine. It’s destroying our way of life,” says Gerold Blackrock, a resident of Black Mesa.

Peabody’s strip mines harm the health of communities wherever they operate, from Black Mesa to Appalachia. Appalachian miners’ hard-earned healthcare benefits and pensions are threatened by Peabody’s business practices. “Peabody and Arch dumped their obligations to retired miners into Patriot. This was a calculated decision to cheat people out of their pensions,” said retired United Mine Workers of America miner Terry Steele.(excerpt)

Yet another polluting industry cheating workers and destroying indigenous land;-/ Read and share!

Earth First! Newswire

Cross Posted from Censored News

By Derek Minnow Bloom, Black Mesa Indigenous Support

Zach Chasnoff, Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment

Fern Benally, Navajo, center. St Louis Post Dispatch photo. 

ST. LOUIS, MO — About one hundred protesters gathered in downtown St. Louis today outside of the Peabody Coal corporate headquarters. St. Louis locals were joined by Navajo residents from Black Mesa, Ariz., Appalachians from coal-burdened West Virginia, and supporters from across the United States to demand the cessation of strip mining and accountability for land and people.  

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Bill McKibben’s Math: Climate Change Hits Home (in a 22-City Tour) by Phil Aroneanu — YES! Magazine

Bill McKibben’s Math: Climate Change Hits Home (in a 22-City Tour) by Phil Aroneanu — YES! Magazine.

Bill McKibben’s Math: Climate Change Hits Home (in a 22-City Tour)
It shouldn’t take a hurricane to blow open the debate about climate change. But Sandy might help 350.org prove what’s at stake in a nationwide campaign to divest university endowments from the fossil fuel industry.
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by Phil Aroneanu
posted Nov 05, 2012

Flooded Bridge photo by Barry Yanowitz

Photo by Barry Yanowitz.

Phil Aroneanu is an organizer with 350.org

For two hours last Monday night, New York City got pummeled by Hurricane Sandy, along with much of the New Jersey and Connecticut coast. The windows started bowing and rattling with every gust, and rain pelted the glass sideways. Nobody was on the streets.

Sitting in our third-floor apartment in Brooklyn, my wife and I pretended to read our books and traded nervous looks each time a gust shook the hatch that leads up to our roof. I’d been following the reports closely, so I knew we weren’t in danger of getting flooded. But like many people around the world, I was glued to the white glow of my smartphone as my Twitter feed flooded with images of rising waters on the Jersey shore and in Manhattan and Brooklyn.
Sitting in my apartment last week, it felt like all the work I had done over the past few years had come to naught—we’d failed in our mission of, and this was the beginning of the end.

That night, I finally understood what many of my friends in Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Maldives, and countless other places on the planet must feel each time a massive typhoon or record flooding hits. Climate change finally hit home for me: I was experiencing it in my own house and on my own skin.

For the first time since 2009, when the United States Senate voted down an ill-fated climate bill, politicians seem to be connecting the dots between extreme weather and climate change. New York’s Governor Andrew Cuomo broke the election-year silence around the issue in a press conference just 36 hours after the storm passed, and Mayor Bloomberg trumpeted President Obama’s climate credentials in an endorsement the next day.

Times Square photo by 350.org

As Hurricane Sandy barrels down on the East Coast, a group of activists with 350.org unfurls a giant parachute banner.

Photo courtesy of 350.org.

“Climate change is a reality,” Cuomo said. “Extreme weather is a reality. It is a reality that we are vulnerable.”

It shouldn’t take a hurricane to blow open the debate about climate change. But sometimes—especially in politics—reality needs to bust in at gale force to push back the millions of dollars that fossil fuel companies have spent in a 20-year effort to strongarm, threaten, and lobby politicians to stay quiet about climate.

And yet, sitting in my apartment last week, I wasn’t thinking about climate science or politics. I was emotional: tired, raw, and defeated. It felt like all the work I had done with my colleagues at 350.org over the past few years had come to naught—we’d failed in our mission of warning the globe about climate catastrophe, and this was the beginning of the end. How could we possibly fight the fossil fuel companies who insist on dumping carbon into the atmosphere, blocking progress on clean energy, and warming the planet, when we’re busy recovering from the second “once-in-a-lifetime” storm in just two years?

As I watched people in my neighborhood pick themselves up, clear trash and branches off the sidewalks in front of their houses, and get back to work, my fatigue gave way to the fighting spirit that New Yorkers showed after 9/11—I was angry. Righteously angry.

It’s that fighting spirit that we’re bringing to Do the Math, 350.org’s 22-city tour that connects the dots between climate change, politics, and the fossil fuel industry.

taxicabs hurricane sandy by Dave S-555.jpg
What Climate-Driven Hurricane Sandy Teaches about Cooperation
It’s 3 a.m. and the wind’s howling. Do you know your neighbors?

In an effort to silence action on climate change, coal, oil, and gas companies have dumped more than $153 million into the 2012 presidential election alone. That’s a cynical move, as these companies already possess reserves of oil, gas, and coal that, if burned, would release five times the amount of carbon that the planet’s atmosphere can safely hold. It’s clear that the fossil fuel industry has become a rogue force—its business model is predicated on burning up the planet, and it consistently frustrates progress on clean energy.

In each of the 22 cities, 350.org and a whole crew of partners will kick off a campaign to divest University endowments from any stocks, bonds, and funds that include fossil fuel companies. It will echo the divestment effort of the 1980s that brought South Africa’s apartheid government to its knees. Student activists across the country are already sounding the alarm on fossil fuel investments, making the case that a Sandy-like future is no future at all. Folks from East Texas to the Pacific Northwest to New England are leaning into local and regional fossil fuel infrastructure campaigns, fighting tar sands pipelines and coal ports.

Fossil fuel companies have already increased the world’s temperature by one degree, and Hurricane Sandy, along with the wildfires, droughts, record heat, and floods of 2012, is the result. It’s time to fight back.

Phil Aroneanu wrote this article for YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses powerful ideas with practical actions. In, 2007 he co-founded the Step It Up campaign with a small group of students and author/activist Bill McKibben. In 2008, the group built on the success of Step It Up to launch the innovative 350.org. Phil currently serves as campaign director of 350.org.


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If ever we needed to vote…

If we just complain about the cabal/illuminati/shadow govt running things in ways we don’t like, nothing will change. But if we get out and get active, if we vote and if we work to create real change from the ground up in our communities whether thru political activism, or other ways like permaculture, Transition Town initiatives, community gardens, helping at risk youth-whatever YOU are good at and love doing that can improve your community-don’t hesitate to get out there and DO it!

cadesertvoice

A must see by Rev. Barber…

As Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) said so well at the Democratic National Convention this summer:

“My dear friends, your vote is precious, almost sacred,” Lewis said. “It is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have to create a more perfect union.”


 
 

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Sonora’s Indigenous unite to protect Mother Earth-CENSORED NEWS

Monday, October 29, 2012

Sonora’s Indigenous unite to protect Mother Earth

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

HERMOSILLO, Mexico — Indigenous Peoples of Sonora, Mexico, supported the Guarijios who oppose the construction of the Los Pilares dam that could lead to the loss of their land and relocation. During the Second Reunion of Spiritual Guides, Indigenous leaders also united in support of the Yaqui who are battling the theft of their water from their river, the Rio Yaqui.
Sonoran Indigenous united against the drug trafficking that is impacting Los Pimas in southern Sonora and the gold mining and mega agriculture project targeting the O’odham ceremonial community of Quitovac in northern Sonora near the Arizona border.
The battle to protect the water and land from mining, and the destruction of development and tourism on Indigenous lands, were the focus of the discussion during the gathering Oct. 26–27. Indigenous Peoples also consulted on ways to preserve their language and culture.
In the state of Sonora, old growth forests are being destroyed, and workers exploited for low wages, for the production of charcoal, which continues unregulated. The rivers are being poisoned by corporations.
Meanwhile, in a separate action in the state of Sonora on Sunday, Comca’ac (Seri) reclaimed ancestral lands near Kino Bay. Asserting their rights to the land, Seri gathered for a ceremony as they reclaimed their territory. (Photo: Today Seri occupy homeland near Kino Bay, by Brenda Norrell.)
Guarijio battling dam construction in this video by Censored News during an interview on Saturday:
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2012/10/video-interview-guarijios-battle-dam.html
In support of the Guarijio battling the dam, Traditional O’odham leaders said, “The Guarijio have not been properly informed or afforded proper consultation with respect to transparent information regarding detailed project plans of the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project on the upper River Mayo in southeast Sonora State and the Guarijio have not been properly informed or afforded proper consultation of studies outlining negative impacts that will interrupt their livelihood.”
“The Guarijio have been affected by being targeted with unfair local and regional media (press and television) reports that they are ‘opposed to development’ and the projects reputed benefits. The Guarijio are being judged publicly without the benefit of being properly informed or afforded proper consultation with respect to transparent information regarding detailed project plans of the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project on the upper River Mayo in southeast Sonora State.”
The Traditional Leaders of Sonora issued this resolution of support for the Guarijio:
The Traditional O’odham Leaders of Sonora, Mexico are again astounded that the Mexican Government at this time of technological advancement has not acquired the basic principles of honesty and civilized decency in existence with the natural world. As within our region time and time again development is being permitted without respect or proper consultation to the local population. Development moves forward without transparent compliance to the cultural, environmental and biological statutes enacted by the government of Mexico.
The Traditional O’odham Leaders of Sonora, Mexico represent the O’odham communities of northern Sonora, Mexico, and are recognized as the official representatives sanctioned by the O’odham community members, and recognized by the State and Federal government of Mexico.
Having discussed the impacts that the proposed LOS PILARES / BICENTENARIO dam project on the upper River Mayo in southeast Sonora state, northwest Mexico the Traditional O’odham Leaders of Sonora support the objections of the Guarijio:
The Guarijio have not been properly informed or afforded proper consultation with respect to transparent information regarding detailed project plans of the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project on the upper River Mayo in southeast Sonora State and the Guarijio have not been properly informed or afforded proper consultation of studies outlining negative impacts that will interrupt their livelihood.
The Guarijio have been affected by being targeted with unfair local and regional media (press and television) reports that they are “opposed to development” and the projects reputed benefits. The Guarijio are being judged publicly without the benefit of being properly informed or afforded proper consultation with respect to transparent information regarding detailed project plans of the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project on the upper River Mayo in southeast Sonora State.
The Environmental Impact Analysis (EIA) fails to include significant social and environmental impacts. The Guarijio were not properly informed or afforded proper consultation with respect to the transparent information regarding detailed project plans of the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project to include participation and contribution of the Guarijio in the EIA to assist in the identification of significant cultural, social, biological and environmental impacts that the Los Pilares / Bicentenario dam project twill have on the existence of the population in the region.
Identical to the O’odham, the Guarijío as well as Pima and Mayo peoples have populated this region since ancient times. The indigenous culture, traditions and lives depend upon the resources of the region such as the water and associated ecosystems that are essential for the livelihood to survive.
The impacts of the proposed dam include physical displacement of homes and communities gravely impacting historical and cultural heritage. The proposed dam project will destroy the natural resources that provides for food and medicinal resources as well as traditional building materials which are now available to the community.
The Traditional O’odham Leaders of Sonora, Mexico fully support the Guarijío and encourage solidarity with all our relatives of the region to work in unity to protect our rights as indigenous people and our responsibilities to the land and the universe.
Declaración de los Líderes Tradicionales O’odham en apoyo al Pueblo Guarijío
http://chiltepines.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/declaracion-de-los-lideres-tradicionales-oodham-en-apoyo-al-pueblo-guarijio/

Posted by brendanorrell@gmail.com at 2:08 AM

Link to original story: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2012/10/sonoras-indigenous-unite-to-protect.html